Bryce Canyon National Park

Let’s get this out of the way right now: Bryce Canyon Nation National Park does not actually contain a canyon. Shocking isn’t it? The place is actually an amphitheater created by headward erosion (as opposed to erosion from a central stream). It is located in Utah but at a higher altitude than Zion National Park. This area was settled in the 1850s by Mormons and the spectacular beauty of the place prompted it to be promoted to National Park in 1923.
The Bryce amphitheater is filled with thousands of hoodoos, a geological structure formed by a thin spire of rock that protrudes from the ground. The red and oranges colors of the rocks are a sight to see at either sunset or sunrise, when the hoodoos catch the rays from their sides.
I was much more impressed by Bryce than I was with Zion or even Yosemite. The landscape just can’t be described by words, I had never seen such an otherworldly scenery before. I almost felt like Spacement Spiff on one of those weird planets.
This National Park is home to what is considered the best 3-mile hike in the world. So naturally we had to do it! It involves descending in the amphitheater among hoodoos of various sizes and shapes, crossing a forest patch near the bottom then coming back up via the Navajo trail between two very high rock faces. This last section is called Wall Street and is home to quite a lot of falling rocks. It was recently closed due to the trail being completely blocked. The last climb is not that difficult particularly as one has to stop quite often to admire the ever changing surroundings.
Outside the park, there is a “village” composed only of hotels, shops and stores. That’s where we stumbled upon beers such as Polygamy Porter (“why have just one?”) and other microbreweries goodies. Unfortunately, the food spots left a lot to be desired, so stick with the Bryce Lodge for dinner if you ever have the chance to visit.

[Click on the images for larger and better versions]

Let’s get this out of the way right now: Bryce Canyon Nation National Park does not actually contain a canyon. Shocking isn’t it? The place is actually an amphitheater created by headward erosion (as opposed to erosion from a central stream). It is located in Utah but at a higher altitude than Zion National Park. This area was settled in the 1850s by Mormons and the spectacular beauty of the place prompted it to be promoted to National Park in 1923.

Bryce Line

Bryce Line

Hoodoo Castle

Hoodoo Castle

The Bryce amphitheater is filled with thousands of hoodoos, a geological structure formed by a thin spire of rock that protrudes from the ground. The red and oranges colors of the rocks are a sight to see at either sunset or sunrise, when the hoodoos catch the rays from their sides.

Bryce Cathetral at Sunset

Bryce Cathetral at Sunset

Bryce Rim at Sunset

Bryce Rim at Sunset

I was much more impressed by Bryce than I was with Zion or even Yosemite. The landscape just can’t be described by words, I had never seen such an otherworldly scenery before. I almost felt like Spacement Spiff on one of those weird planets.

Bryce - Crooked Tree

Bryce - Crooked Tree

This National Park is home to what is considered the best 3-mile hike in the world. So naturally we had to do it! It involves descending in the amphitheater among hoodoos of various sizes and shapes, crossing a forest patch near the bottom then coming back up via the Navajo trail between two very high rock faces. This last section is called Wall Street and is home to quite a lot of falling rocks. It was recently closed due to the trail being completely blocked. The last climb is not that difficult particularly as one has to stop quite often to admire the ever changing surroundings.

Bryce Path (Queen's Garden Trail)

Bryce Path (Queen's Garden Trail)

Bryce Canyon Wall Street

Bryce Canyon Wall Street

Outside the park, there is a “village” composed only of hotels, shops and stores. That’s where we stumbled upon beers such as Polygamy Porter (“why have just one?”) and other microbreweries goodies. Unfortunately, the food spots left a lot to be desired, so stick with the Bryce Lodge for dinner if you ever have the chance to visit.

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7 thoughts on “Bryce Canyon National Park

  1. Wow! I got here because I did a post on Bryce Canyon today, and this post was automatically generated. SO glad I came to see this!

    Your pictures are fantastic. (My favorite one in this post is the crooked tree with the hoodoos in the distance behind it.)

    So I decided to look at other posts. We are in this area every summer, and now I KNOW I have to go to Antelope Canyon. (We always pass through Page.) Those pictures are absolutely amazing. And I’ve wanted to go to Monument Valley, but now we know more about it and what to do there. (Definitely going to drive the road 2 hours before sunset when we go!) We live 3 or 4 hours from Mesa Verde and haven’t been there because that’s more of a weekend trip for us, but we know we’ll go there. Your pictures make it look so worth going.

    I look forward to seeing more of your trip; this blog is definitely going into my reader. (Not that I ever keep up, but at least I’ll find it again and visit periodically.)

    I also want to invite you to participate in a meme called My World Tuesday. (http://showyourworld.blogspot.com) Many of your posts are perfect for this meme. If you are interested, go to the site and check out the rules. The main ones are that when you link from the site you have your post up and identified as a My World post, you link with your country (or wherever you are showing) and you link back to the site. I truly believe your photography would capture some attention there once people see it! (It always starts on Monday at 1 p.m. and is up all week until the following Monday.)

    Whether or not your do My World, I will definitely be back to see more!

    • Thank you so much! Your comments are greatly appreciated. I mostly do this for friends and family (and my own self ;^) but it’s always nice to get visits from people who randomly land here from time to time. This makes the whole process really worth it.

      I must admit that Antelope Canyon was MUCH more impressive than Mesa Verde. Next time you are in Page, make sure you take the morning tour. You won’t regret it. As for Mesa Verde, well the NPS sometimes holds “free week-end” events, so if you don’t have an anual pass, I suggest waiting for one. Mesa Verde, while on the World Heritage list, is not for everyone as it’s more geared towards cultural and historical facts than landscapes and nature.

      I will of course check out the blog you mentioned, it sounds quite interesting.

      Thanks again and best regards!

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